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Character and Chemistry

24 Mar 2015

Character

“People are not your most important asset – the right people are” -Jim Collins.

Like the various color tones of a diamond that determines it quality and value, people come in all sizes, unique personalities, and interesting characteristics.

Character refers to a prospective candidate’s personality and attitudinal preferences. Attitudinal preferences can be rather broad. The dilemma for potential employers is how do you determine someone’s attitude? From an organizational psychology point of view, attitudinal preferences can cover decision making styles, leadership preferences, interpersonal skills, motivation, task preferences, work interest and environmental preferences.

Chemistry refers to how appealing and attractive each party finds the other. As in any courtship, there has to be some power of attraction. Attracting a candidate and positioning the company and job as an appealing choice is not very much different.

Companies today are constantly in a war for talent. Every business leader knows that their growth potential and pathway to organizational greatness is only limited by its ability to attract the right people.

Hence, it is imperative for hiring managers and recruiters to fully understand what truly appeals to the candidates. Only by appreciating the person’s personal values and life themes, hiring managers will understand how to “sell” the job to the candidate.

Many times, the hiring manager or recruiter only talks about what the job requirements are and what the expectations are, but neglects to show a genuine interest about what the candidate finds appealing. In other words, finding ways to pluck the candidate’s heart strings to create that desired emotional resonance.

Today’s Millennials and Gen X and Gen Y examine more than just the basic salary of an open position. They may be influenced by the social causes of the company, the ability to move quickly into a role of responsibility, or the capability of a leader. They may desire a competent team, a more aggressive management style, or a less aggressive management style.

These factors need to be identified and played to if you wish to attract the desired candidate. Getting that “diamond” to want to be in your company’s jewelry can be done much easier if you use the Harrison Assessment as part of your selection process. The Harrison Assessment can help direct your communication to the job candidate that your organization is the perfect fit for the diamond.



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